Calling All Hybrid-ers

Discussion in 'Hybrid Pad' started by Trista, Sep 16, 2013.

  1. Trista

    Trista I'm Working On It

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    Hybrid-ers... it's a word! :giggle Work with me here!!

    Give me your best tips for taking photos of your fabulous projects. I am especially interested in photo tips for project life/pocket page photos b/c I have the worst time with glare.

    Help a sister out and I'll be your best friend. :flirty


    :heartslub
     
  2. carrottop

    carrottop Member

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    I'm not an expert in either area, but I have done a few hybrid projects and I can share what I've learned from my mistakes...:whistle

    First, turn off your flash. I never have great results when I try to take photos of my projects with it. I also try to take pictures mid-morning or shortly after dinner because the natural light I have available here is the best at those times. i also try to take photos near a window that has soft light coming thorough it rather than harsh. Open the drapes and let the light in. I place my object a few feet away and start snapping photos. Or, if the light is right, I take everything outside and shoot the pictures on patio. That usually happens on cloudy days around here. Use a tripod whenever you can, and if you can't for whatever reason, then try to set the camera on something else, like the table you are photographing your item on. Do whatever you can to eliminate camera shake.

    Put something behind your object to keep the background from bring too busy, like a tablecloth, sheet, or a couple of sheets of cardstock. Use subtle or neutral solid colors. I've seen some people even use a patterned paper where the background color and pattern are subdued, and it looked great. A lot of cool shots I've seen also have fun props involved like an easel, a flower frog, vases, figurines in the shot with the hybrid item (I haven't used any myself yet, though).

    If I think my photos still need a little help, then I run an action or use filters in PSE to punch the color or subdue it a bit, depending on what is needed.

    I'm just a beginner at this, so take what I say with a grain of salt, but those are some things I've learned. The best way to improve is lots of practice. My very first shots really sucked, and now I'm moving onto decent photos, but have a ways to go before my shots are *stunning.*. :giggle
     
  3. mrspotts

    mrspotts Could I get a planner for my planner?

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    Lol @ hybrid-ers.

    Project Life can be such a bear to photograph. I do most of my photographing by my front door because I have the best natural light there. Depending on what time of day it is I sometimes have to step outside and take the photo. Using a tripod is helpful to get the sharp crisp look through the page protectors. I know some people actually take their cards out of the page protectors and lay them on top fo the page protectors so they don't get any glare or haze. One HUGE tip I have is to put something white underneath your page protectors. This gives a nice blank slate for your photos to be seen on.

    If you want tips for photographing other hybrid projects let me know. :)
     
  4. heathergw

    heathergw Singing in the Neil mobile

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    yes to the white background, I have a white poster board I use... the key is being directly above... if you aren't dead center you will get glare... I have it on the floor next to the sliding glass door... and I know it's dangerous and I should probably figure out something else... but I stand on the dining room table and lean over leaning up against the sliding glass door... eek

    but yes, find a spot by a window or door where you get the most natural light... or even outside in the shade, weather permitting...

    and I know lots of people who take them out of the pockets and set them on top... I should probably do that

    also if you have a dSLR, shoot in RAW... easier to fix :)
     
  5. Trista

    Trista I'm Working On It

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    Lorell - These are great tips. I did a little prop setup for a recent hybrid project - gift bag/gift card/card set. I don't know why I didn't think to get fancy for this pocket page spread. The lighting tip has helped the most. I am now trying lots of settings near a window and until I get that figured out I am def shooting with everything out of the pocket.


    Jewelle, more great tips... thanks! I was using a blue poster board but have switched to white and am much happier with the result. Taking everything out of the pocket has really helped get the crisp look that I was looking for.
    Heather for Christmas you are getting a harness. YIPES! The things we scrappers put ourselves through to get the perfect shot. :giggle Being a little vertically challenged has def made it difficult to shoot straight on from above. I have a large white dry erase board. I am going to make some magnet clips and try hanging my pages to see if I can achieve the crisp look. And RAW! *faint* - I am just so intimidated.

    Thank you ladies for the tips! It has certainly given me a great place to start!
     
  6. javamonster

    javamonster Rwaarrr!

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    I know this is an old thread, but I was checking out this forum, and...okay, to the point! :D

    A while back when I was practicing shooting portraits, I bought a big cheap LARGE remainder of black velvet from Joanne's Fabrics. Hm. I probably still have it around. I always meant to get a white or off-white sheet of velvet, too, but never got around it.

    Depending on the coloring of your subject (if it's light or dark), to begin with you could get yourself a big box, and cut the top and one side off (to be the front) and cut the sides on a diagonal, if you want. Then you could duct-tape your velvet (of any color, really) for the optimal background. Set your objects in the center, or where it gets the best light, and set up your tripod.

    I remember in high school when we photographed our art portfolios, the school had a set-up where the flat art-work was under a sheet of glass, and there were two lights set at 45 degrees on each side of the glass in order to eliminate glare from the lights, and to light it evenly. There must be some websites that show how to make one, and how it works. It can't be too hard! (she says, fatal last words)
     
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2014

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