question about designing and copyright

Discussion in 'Scrapping Pad' started by ad77, Oct 15, 2021.

  1. ad77

    ad77 Well-Known Member

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    I have a question for designers... Today when I see in M3 collab kit picture I know (OK, not exactly this picture, but I know the style of this artist from my childhood - and also the text advertising pedicure:-) on the stamp is in Czech language) I wonder how copyright is handled in each country. Because digiscrap designers have TOUs to protect their work, but what I´m really curious about is difference in approach to copyright in each country...
    When using some pictures/stamps/clippings etc., also extracted subjects which someone designed in real or text from newspaper etc. - are you following just conditions valid for your country or are you trying to find how the origin country approach copyright?
     
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  2. bellbird

    bellbird Pollywog

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    that's an interesting observation and question - i have no idea what the answer is but i love that you could read some of the text in Czech!
     
  3. Karen

    Karen Wiggle it, just a little bit!

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    This is an intriguing question! I have no idea how that's all handled!
     
  4. Eyeore

    Eyeore Think it over, think it under

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    @ad77 An answer from Paula is that "The vintage images that I use I scanned from my collection of memorabilia and they are so old that they are public domain."
     
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  5. ad77

    ad77 Well-Known Member

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    I don´t know whose contribution the stamp with a cheerful man was, I just see it on preview, but I think the author of the illustration was Miloš Noll (my oppinion, not saying I´m right:-)), who died in 1998 (so it wouldn´t be 70 years yet).
    Anyway:-) - that picture made me to ask, but I´m interested in it general longer. If designers are trying to find resources and authors of the illustrations etc., to verify their biographic data and conditions valid in the country of origin, or just think - that looks quite old, so it must be OK (or - digiscrapbook industry is so small, so there is no need to deal with).
    I understand that something is absolutely clear and "safe" - using pictures from very old herbariums, maps etc. But the production of the 20th century can be problematic - typically when the author started to create very young and then lived a long life...
     
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  6. paula kesselring

    paula kesselring Designer

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    @ad77 yikes, I really thought it was much older than that, thanks for the heads up!!:bk
     
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  7. Rachel Jefferies

    Rachel Jefferies Designer

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    Hi Lucie!

    I agree with you, it can be, and is often problematic using illustrations. I know I speak for a very large group of designers here when I assure you that a lot of time goes into sourcing pieces that are used in kits that are not drawn from our own hand. Copyright is a serious matter, and a credible designer does absolutely not use items with the mindset that it is old so it must be okay, or hoping that nobody will notice because we are a small industry. Personally I only use resources from a very few limited and safe places where it's categorically clear that the piece is in the public domain and free of any copyright.

    Thank you for your love of Mixed Media and for bringing this discussion forward and alerting Paula about her stamp, it's since been removed from the M3 collection.

    Wishing you a lovely weekend :beat
     
  8. bestcee

    bestcee Lorelei and Rory are my neighbors

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    Stamps have intriguing copyright laws too. Depending on the country, and how it was designed, the copyright doesn't always belong to the artist.

    For example, US Postal stamps made before 1971 are public domain, regardless of the artist.

    Some other countries have similar rules regarding postal stamps, and some artists who create for a specific company were commissioned by the government and therefore have no personal copyright to the image.

    Postal stamp copyright is very intriguing, and I totally went down a random rabbit hole of information because of your question. :agree Thanks for teaching me something new!
     

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